[Roar-members] Report on ROAR Nets for 15 and 17 Nov 2015

ROAR Nets Report for 15th and 17th Nov 2015

*0630z-0700z ANZO Net on 7110*
_From Bill VK4ZD_
Noel VK2IWT was 59+15 and gave me 59+45
Phil VK2MCB was 59+5 and gave me 59
Peter VK3KCD was 58-9 and he gave me 57
John ZL2JPM was 58-9 and gave me 57

*0700z – 0800z Europe – Anzo Net on 14,295.2 Long Path*
_From Bill VK4ZD_
Peter VK3KCD was 59+ and gave me 59
John ZL2JPM was 57 and gave me 55-6
Phil VK2MCB and I exchanged 55 reports
Noel VK2IWT was 33 and gave me 44 I think
Doug ZL1BFS and I exchanged 58 reports
Klaus HB9CQS was 59+15-20 and gave me 59+
Nick G4HCK was 55-6 peaking at 57 and gave me 55
Pertti EA7GSU and I exchanged 57 reports
Brian G3LUW was 56-7 and gave me 57-8
Malcolm PA3AHC was 56 and gave me 55 on his temporary dipole
The net closed at 0800z

_From John G3OKT_
Hi Bill, comment from Brian if you are able to put together shortened report for this week.
Glad to see propagation improving.
Brian doesn’t mention Storm Abigail which battered NW Scotland.
Obviously didn’t affect Southern England where he is, but caused me to take antenna down before entering hospital for a few days.
73s John

_From Brian G3LUW_
The propagation on 20m was very good. There was a lot of background noise but most signals were strong.
I worked or heard John ZL2JPM, Doug ZL1BFS, Bill VK4ZD, Peter VK3KCD, Noel  VK2IWT, Phil VK2MCB. All very readable signals.
I could read Malcolm PA3AHC. Both Klaus HB9CQS and Pertti EA7GSU were 5&9+.
Nick G4HCK was not heard here, but got good reports from downunder.
The net was well under way when I switched on at 0730, and Bill closed the net on the hour.

*0900z -1000z UK 80-metre Net on 3,694*
_From Brian G3LUW
_
80m was also quite noisy, but John G7OAI, Tommy G2FUU and Bob G3SZF were good signals.
As I closed the net at 0835, Bruce G0PCF called in, and received a report from each of us..
73   Brian  G3LUW

*1800z – 1830z RIBI evening 80-metre Net on 3,693*
_Tommy G2FUU_ had said earlier that he would check for any stations.

*2000z – 2030z N.AM Transcontinental Net on 14,287*
_From Phil  N9HWO_
What happened to the net on 14.287 at 2000 UTC today (Nov. 15)?

_From Bill VK4ZD_
No signals were readable with me on this net. I heard substantial QRM from South America on 14.285.
Peter VK3KCD heard nothing but Noel VK2IWT said he heard some stations briefly.

*0700z – 0730z Tuesday 10th November 2015 NZ 80-m net on 3,693*

*0700z – 0730z Tuesday 10th November 2015 EUR net on 14,295.2 / 7.136+/-*
_From Bill VK4ZD_
I didn’t get to this net until 0715z and proceeded to contact all stations as VI90IARU on this frequency
Les PA0SDZ was 55-6 and gave me 57
Pertti EA7GSU and I exchanged 57 reports
Malcolm PA3AHC was 55 and gave me 44
Jean-Pierre F1CFA was 57 and gave me 58
John ZL2JPM was 58
Brian G3LUW was 56 and gave me 59
Klaus HB9CQS was 59

QSY’d to 7.135 at 0740z
Brian G3LUW was 55 and gave me 54
Pertti EA7GSU was 44 and gave me 55
Jean-Pierre was 22 here
Klaus HB9CQS was 57 and gave me 55
Les PA0SDZ was 22 here

That’s all for now,

Best wishes to John G3OKT as he recovers from his knee replacement.
_______________________________________________
Roar-members mailing list
Roar-members@ifroar.org
http://ifroar.org/mailman/listinfo/roar-members_ifroar.org

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[ans] ANS 321 AMSAT NEWS SERVICE SPECIAL BULLETIN – AO-85 Commissioned, Handed Over To AMSAT-NA Operations

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE SPECIAL BULLETIN
ANS-321

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AO-85 Commissioned, Handed Over To AMSAT-NA Operations

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-321.01
ANS-321 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 321.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
November 17, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-321.01

AO-85 Commissioned, Handed Over To AMSAT-NA Operations

AO-85 has been formally commissioned and turned over to AMSAT
Operations, who are now responsible for the scheduling and modes.

The following guidelines are provided for users:

Uplink power should be on the order of minimum 200 W EIRP for full
quieting at lower antenna elevation angles. Your mileage may vary.
With an Arrow, 5 W has been used successfully to make contacts.

Polarity is important. The satellite antennas are linear. So, if you
are using linearly polarized antennas, you will need to adjust
throughout the pass. Full duplex operation facilitates these
adjustments while transmitting and is highly recommended.

The downlink is very strong and should be heard well with almost any
antenna.

Downlink audio is 5 kHz deviation, as expected. Many will perceive
that the audio is “low." This is an effect of the filtering below 300
Hz, which provides for the DUV telemetry, coupled with any noise on
the uplink signal resulting from lack of full quieting or being off
frequency. That makes for less fidelity than a typical receiver in
terms of audio frequencies passed.

Transmit (downlink) frequency varies with temperature.  Due to the
wide range of temperatures we are seeing in the eclipse cycle, the
transmitter can be anywhere from around 500 Hz low at 10°C to near 2
kHz low at 40°C.

Receive frequency has been generally agreed to be about 435.170 MHz,
although the AFC makes that hard to pin down and also helps with the
uplinks that are off frequency.

Probably the most notable observations about AO-85 are an apparent
lack of sensitivity and difficulty in turning on the repeater with
the 67 Hz CTCSS when it is not yet activated, or holding it on by the
presence of the CTCSS.  We have determined a probable cause for the
sensitivity issue and while that can’t be fixed on AO-85 we are
taking steps to prevent similar issues on the rest of the Fox-1
CubeSats.  The tone detection threshold along with the receive
sensitivity issue makes it hard to bring up the repeater.  This is
being addressed by adjusting the values for a valid tone detection in
the other Fox-1 CubeSats now that we have on orbit information about
temperatures and power budget.  Full details will be in the Nov/Dec
AMSAT Journal.

It is important to remember that science is the reason behind the
Fox-1 satellites. Not only does science help with the launch cost, it
provides a great amount of educational value both from the science
payload and in amateur radio itself. The data-under-voice (DUV)
telemetry is an excellent way to provide the science without
sacrificing the use of the satellite for communications, which would
be the case if higher speed downlinks were needed. DUV provides
constant science as long as the repeater is in use, which in turn
provides more downlink data for the science – a mutually beneficial
combination.

Fox-1A is AMSAT-NA’s first CubeSat. Many new techniques are
incorporated and lessons will be learned, as with any new “product."
The Fox-1 Project is a series of CubeSats. A total of five will be
built and flown. Launches are scheduled for three more, and a new
NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative proposal will be submitted for the
fifth. We will incorporate changes from what we learn in each launch,
to the extent possible, in subsequent Fox-1 CubeSats.

Of the four NASA sponsored CubeSats on the ELaNa XII launch October
8, we are sad to report that ARC1 was never heard from and BisonSat
was lost after a few weeks of operation. AMSAT extends our deepest
sympathy to the people who worked so hard on these projects. To our
members, we want to say that the Fox Team is very proud and pleased
that our first CubeSat is very successful and hopefully will be for
some time.

[ANS thanks Jerry NoJY for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org
_______________________________________________
Via the ANS mailing list courtesy of AMSAT-NA
http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

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[iaru-news:1432] Progess of Secondary Allocation for Amateur Radio at 60 Meters

Attached is an IARU News Release dated 16 November 2015 detailing progress of WRC15 Agenda Item 1.4 (Secondary Allocation for Amateur Radio – 60 Meters).
73, Rod W6ROD
============
NEWS RELEASE

International Amateur Radio Union

Newington, CT 06131-0905 USA

FAX: +1 860 594 0259

E-Mail: secretary @ iaru.org

16 November 2015

P.O. Box 310905

For immediate release

Allocation at 60 Meters Showing Positive Progress Through WRC15

The World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC15) is currently underway in

Geneva.  The WRC started 2 November and will conclude 27 November.  Consensus has

developed around a new 15 kHz-wide global secondary 60 meter Amateur Radio

allocation at 5351.5-5366.5 kHz.  Last week, Conference Working Group 4B agreed to

the global secondary allocation, with power limits designed to protect primary services

from harmful interference. The current compromise within WG4B making the allocation

possible has also cleared Committee 4 but must clear one more level at the conference.

The issue is not final until it does.

“While this is a positive step to a worldwide secondary amateur allocation at 5 MHz it is

not yet final until it has been approved by the Conference Plenary” noted Tim Ellam

VE6SH, President of the IARU.  Ellam, who attended the first part of the Conference

added “The 15 kHz allocation on a secondary basis is the result of significant

compromise by a number of stakeholders in this portion of the spectrum. It will provide

the opportunity for access to 60m for countries that do not presently have a domestic

At the beginning of the WRC, a number of administrations and the regional

telecommunications organization (RTO) representing Russia and 10 of its neighboring

countries (RCC) were strongly and actively opposed to the new amateur allocation. After

more than a dozen sub working group meetings, it became clear that the widest

achievable allocation was 15 kHz and that a power limit in the neighborhood of 15 W

effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) would have to be part of the package.

“It took all the effort and resources of the entire IARU-team to ensure this 15 kHz

compromise and to persuade some administrations to abandon their no-allocation

position,” said IARU Vice President Ole Garpestad LA2RR.

In other WRC-15 developments, a possible agenda item at the next WRC for an amateur

allocation at 50 MHz in Region 1 cleared its first hurdle. A proposed agenda item to align

the 160 meter allocation in Region 1 with the rest of the world was not likely to be

The International Amateur Radio Union WRC Team is headed by IARU President Tim

Ellam VE6SH and Vice President Ole Garpestad LA2RR.  In addition, the following

amateurs were a part of the IARU WRC Team: Reinaldo Leandro YV5AM, President of

IARU Region 2 and Faisal Al-Ajmi 9K2RR, Vice President of IARU Region 1.

A number of other amateurs were part of the IARU WRC Team while serving on a

national delegation:  Colin Thomas G3PSM, Hans Blondeel Timmerman PB2T, Ken

Yamamoto JA1CJP, Bryan Rawlings VE3QN, Tafa Diop 6W1KI, Don Wallace

ZL2TLL, Dale Hughes VK1DSH, Flávio Archangelo PY2ZX, Ulrich Mueller DK4VW,

Brennan Price N4QX and Jon Siverling WB3ERA.

IARU hosted a small reception at the WRC on November 10 which was attended by a

number of delegations and ITU senior leadership including ITU Secretary General H

Zao.  Attending the reception and participating in part of the WRC were IARU Region 1

President Don Beattie G3BJ and Dave Sumner K1ZZ.  Sumner attended on behalf of the

IARU International Secretariat.

IARU made arrangements for an emergency communications trailer to be on site during

the first part of the Conference. IARU International Coordinator for Emergency

Communications Hans Zimmerman HB9AQS/F5VKP worked with IARU member

society DARC and NOTFUNK Deutschland to provide for a communications trailer and

antenna system that showcased amateur radio emergency communications abilities and

was located in a high traffic area at the Conference facilities. Zimmerman was on site to

explain the use of amateur radio to delegates.

The IARU team continues to follow a number of agenda items which may impact the

amateur services especially a possible WRC-19 agenda item for an allocation to

accommodate small non-amateur, non-geostationary satellites.

A later news release will be distributed at the conclusion of the WRC.

The photo attached below shows IARU International Coordinator for Emergency

Communications Hans Zimmermann HB9AQS/F5VKP observing preparations for the

emergency communications display at WRC15 in Geneva.

—- 000 —

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Amateur Radio Roundtable – Subject: Future of Ham Radio

Amateur Radio Roundtable

Subject: Future of Ham Radio

This week’s W5KUB.com show (November 17th) will feature the James Lea family of amateur radio operators. Not only are James Lea, WX4TV, and his wife Michelle Lea, N8ZQZ, licensed but so are three of their children. The youngest child is taking her test this week and could be licensed by Tuesday evening. These young hams range in the ages from 7 to 13 and are involved in all aspects of ham radio including Satellite, DXing, contesting, portable operation, special event support, homebrewing, etc. They are highly technical and speak at forums.  I interview them at 2015 Hamvention and was blown away by their intelligence, energy, and enthusiasm!  The children have their own ham radio blog called HamRadio.World. Please check it out before the show, read about the outstanding projects they are involved in, and watch their videos. This is an amazing ham family and you will not want to miss this show.  Invite a young person to join you!

If you watched last week, you know that we had technical problems – no Skype audio from our friend Joe Eisenberg, K0NEB, so we used a back-up phone line connection. Since Joe’s kits are in high demand, we decided to postpone his presentation until November 24th.  In addition to Joe’s segment, we will have a segment on near space balloon launches with Jack Crabtree, W7JLC.  Jack has conducted over 154 flights in the last 25 years.

Please send your FCC related questions to Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, at AskRiley@w5kub.com. He will answer your questions on a future webcast, and in some cases, he may just call you on the phone if you leave a number.   Riley retired from the FCC’s Compliance and Information Bureau as Legal Adviser for Enforcement Program.

Amateur Radio Roundtable is a live weekly amateur radio webcast, held every Tuesday night at 8 PM CT (0200 UTC Wednesday) at  W5KUB.com.  The show covers a wide range of topics for ham radio operators and electronic hobbyists; including balloon launches, satellite, go-kits, emergency communications, SDR, digital modes, DXing, home brewing, hamfest updates, and more.  Viewers will have the opportunity to ask questions via the chat room or telephone.

Our shows are usually recorded and placed on YouTube’s W5KUB channel the following day.

We need your help.  If you use Twitter, please send out a tweet 15 minutes before the show or retweet our announcement. I suggest something like “live #hamradio show starts in 15 mins on w5kub.com 8 PM CT".  This should help increase our viewer base.

Towards the end of each show, we provide a link and viewers who have a camera, microphone, and a Google+ account, can join the show. Your video and audio will be on the webcast.  This part of the show is very informal and up to 10 people can join. We talk about anything the viewers want to discuss.

We would like to share pictures of your ham shack on the webcast. Send a picture of your ham shack with a description and we will feature your shack pictures on the show.  In fact, if you give us your permission, your shack could be used as the background of that week’s webcast!

If you have a specific subject idea for a future show, send an email to tom@w5kub.com.

Forward this message to a Friend will allow you to share this message with your friends.

Join us for fun and interesting discussions!

Tom Medlin, W5KUB

 

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聖戰死士變老手 法國反恐難招架

[2015-11-15 03:08:56 聯合報 編譯王麗娟/報導]

巴塔克蘭劇院十三日晚間遭槍手闖入掃射並挾持人質,警方獲報立刻趕到戒備。 歐新社

槍手和自殺炸彈客聯手對多個目標同一時間發動攻擊,是數月來法國反恐單位最戒慎恐懼的夢魘,孰料十三日晚它果真成真。

法國恐攻 年初駭到年終 圖/聯合報提供

安全官員與專家之前即預測,不遠的將來,法國將發生空前的恐攻,且幾乎無從防範。

曾在「對外安全局」情報部門反恐單位工作的特賀提農說:「這些一心想幹到底的傢伙視死如歸,他們精挑目標,個個是作案高手,知道如何製造大破壞。每天都有更多的聖戰士變成老將,這點我們必須說,安全單位根本招架不了。」

死亡的八名攻擊者包括槍手和自殺炸彈客,他們的攻擊目標包括巴塔克蘭劇院,還有共和廣場附近的一家餐館,距離一月時發生恐攻的「查理周刊」從前辦公室不遠。

上述的多管齊下恐攻,是當局的最大夢魘。至今當局還算幸運,已不止一次防止浴血發生,但全拜攻擊者本身無能所賜。

四月時,一名阿爾及利亞學生意外槍擊自己的大腿,警方因此破獲他意圖攻擊巴黎郊區一所教堂陰謀。八月時,兩名休假美國軍人和一名友人在從阿姆特丹到巴黎的一列高速火車上,制伏一名槍手。

不過,隨著愈來愈多經歷過戰爭和受過良好訓練的偏激穆斯林從戰區返回,當局的好運也告罄。這些人數量龐大,無法全掌握在眼簾底下。特賀提農說:「風險最大的,是經過戰爭洗禮返回的冷血年輕人,可能是敘利亞、利比亞,或葉門。他們在此地(法國)取得武器,然後付諸行動。一月時,「查理周刊」和猶太超市遭到聯合攻擊,十七人因此死亡後,反恐、情報、警察和救援單位即一再針對類似的多管齊下攻擊進行演習。

和全球的反恐單位一樣,法國專家也仔細鑽研二○○八年十一月發生的孟買恐攻。十名攻擊者分五路同時發動突襲,造成約一百七十人死亡。但專家說,百密總有一疏,政府的計畫再縝密,仍無法百分百,加上媒體無所不在,更增添複雜度。一名高級反恐官員最近說,現在攻擊者追求的是「最大曝光」。

當局也十分害怕自動機槍攻擊,而巴塔克蘭劇院的恐怖分子使用的正是自動機槍。警方突襲後,但當時至少已八十二人死亡。

原文: 聯合新聞網 全球

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CTARL訊息-1112

各位OM大家好!
本週末有JIDX(SSB)與WAE(RTTY)的比賽,請同好上線踴躍參加!
理監事會即近期將舉行,如果您有任何建議提案,請提交秘書處列入討論!
有一批QSL卡等待領取,招領清單請上網站http://www.ctarl.org.tw/bv5ya/2009-10/QSL-card-list-1041020.xls
全台中繼實驗點測試中,有需要參與測試實驗的同好請與各區幹部聯繫!
相關訊息亦可上網參閱
比賽訊息:
Japan International DX Contest(Phone)
活動日期:活動日期:2015年11月14、15日。
比賽時間︰0700UTC 開始;1300 UTC結束。
主辦單位︰http://www.jidx.org/
信號報告︰RST+CQ Zone
—————————————————
Worked All Europe DX Contest (RTTY)
活動日期:活動日期:2015年11月14、15日。
比賽時間︰0000UTC 開始;2359 UTC結束。
主辦單位︰http://www.waedc.de/
信號報告︰RST+流水序號
本週活動訊息:
南部分會台南地區聚會聯誼活動(每逢大禮拜六晚上)
活動日期:104年11月14日星期六 19:30
活動地點:台南市竹溪里活動中心
活動聯絡人:BX6AM 王河川 0932802969
近期活動訊息:
IARU 成立 90 周年通訊活動(BV90IARU)
活動日期:2015年10月17日~12月31日
主辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會 .
欲參與操作之同好請與BV2FP聯繫!
———————————————————————————————————-
通信紀錄軟體Logger32研討會
活動日期:2015年12月6日(星期日) 早上09:15 至 16:00
主辦單位:中鋼業餘無線電社
協辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會南部分會,高雄業餘無線電俱樂部。
活動地點:高雄市小港區中鋼路1號 (中鋼會議室)
費    用:免費(含午餐)
活動內容:1. 請攜帶筆記型電腦或個人電腦.
                  2. Logger32 安裝,設定.
                  3. 操作方法說明.
                  4. 增強插件介紹.
注意事項:中鋼大門有管制,請提早10分鐘到達門口集合帶隊入場.
聯絡人   : BV7CW(0937635674), BV7FO(0921236791), BV7RF(0933651780)
———————————————————————————————————-
104年度第二次緊急醫療通訊測試
活動日期:2015年12月 12日 (星期六)。
下午13:00開始進場檢測,14:00準時開始 check in。
活動地點: 各縣市衛生局 。
本次通信頻率: 7.060 MHz 。
衛生福利部業餘無線緊急通信電台呼號為「BBB808」。
———————————————————————————————————-
104年度無線電數據定位與數位接收機製作研習活動
活動日期:2015年12月13日(星期日) 08:00 ~ 17:00
主辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會。
協辦單位:台北城市科技大學電腦與通訊工程系。
活動地點:台北城市科技大學(台北市北投區學園路2號)
報名請洽:BX2AN 李建興 0932343587
———————————————————————————————————-
2015 ARDF 全國無線電電波測向(獵狐)競賽活動
活動日期:104年12月20日 09:30-16:00
活動地點:宜蘭敏通快樂農場(宜蘭縣冬山鄉新寮一路260號)
主辦單位:敏通企業股份有限公司
協辦單位:台北城市科技大學 電通系
                 中華民國業餘無線電促進會
                 中華業餘人造衛星協會
報名截止:104年12月7日止或報名人數額滿80人止
李昶毅 先生 0972-808359
技術總監:范家瑜 先生 BM2GJP  0921-827444,活動企劃:蔡耀斌 先生 BV2OL  0932-152060
注意事項:
          1.參賽選手比賽當天須攜帶身分證明文件、健保卡
          2.參賽選手須自備無發射功能之接收器材或由主辦單位提供接收器材參賽
          3.報名人數額滿時,主辦單位有調整參賽人員及人數之權利
※參賽選手必須投保  請務必填寫正確資料※
———————————————————————————————————-
CTARL第十三屆第次會員代表大會
活動日期:104年12月26日 (星期日)上午 11:00。
活動地點:桃園市桃園區護國宮(桃園市桃園區國際路一段401巷123號)。
主辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會。
聯絡人:BV2FP 高大為 0936-105492。
———————————————————————————————————-
北部分會 歲末忘年會
活動日期:104年12月26日 (星期日)中午 12:00。
活動地點:桃園市桃園區護國宮(桃園市桃園區國際路一段401巷123號)。
主辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會北部分會。
聯絡頻率:430.980MHz。
聯絡人:BX2AM 吳建忠 0919-933159, BX2AN 李建興 0932-343587。
———————————————————————————————————-
104年度北部分會會員大會
活動日期:待確定
主辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會北部分會。
活動地點:待確定
聯絡人:分會長 BX2AM 吳建忠 0919-933159
———————————————————————————————————-
北部分會會員知識分享課程活動
主題: 待定
講師:BV3FG
時間:2015/待定

地點:北市萬華區青山里里民活動中心(台北市萬華區環河南路2段臨5之1號)

73,

BV2FP
David Kao 高大為
中華民國業餘無線電促進會
Chinese Taipei Amateur Radio League
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[ARNEWSLINE] Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1985 November 13 2015

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1985 November 13 2015

Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1985 with a release date of Friday,
November 13, 2015 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST. A historic radio frequency gets its own special
event. Amateur Radio on the International Space Station marks 15
successful years. The Radio Club of America and Radio Amateurs of Canada
celebrate hams’ contributions. And a conference in India reaches out to
the youngest amateurs. All this and more in Amateur Radio Newsline
report 1985 coming your way right now.

(Billboard Cart Here and Intro)

MEDIUM WAVE, MAXIMUM ENTHUSIASM

We begin this week’s newscast with a special recognition of a wartime
radio legacy dating back 107 years. In 1908, the international distress
frequency of 500 kHz took effect, as established by the Berlin
International Radiotelegraphic Convention. It’s this historic slice of
the radio spectrum where the action will be happening on Friday, Nov. 13
and Saturday, Nov. 14. Experimental operators in the U.S., Canada as
well as U.S. heritage maritime stations, will work the event carrying
special messages. Five Canadian operators will be participating,
including VE7CNF in Burnaby, British Columbia and VO1NA in Torbay,
Newfoundland.

The ARRL’s Medium-Wave Experiment coordinator Fritz Raab, W1FR, said
most messages being carried will go out as CW. Says Raab: QUOTE"Some
stations will run beacons with special messages, and some will offer
special QSLs. Other stations will simulate maritime communication. They
will call CQ on a designated calling frequency and then QSY to complete
the QSO."ENDQUOTE

Operators won’t be sticking entirely to Medium Frequency, though: Be
listening as the Canadian amateurs engage in cross-band communication
tests on 80 meters and 40 meters.

(ARRL, Radio Amateurs of Canada)

**

ARISS: TOWARD NEWER HORIZONS

[ANCHOR/DON]: Of course, there’s also radio history that was made a
little more recently – like 15 years ago. Imagine being a student in the
year 2000 having a QSO with a ham somewhere out in space. That’s what
students at the Luther Burbank School in the Chicago suburbs did at the
dawn of a program called Amateur Radio on the International Space
Station Amateur Radio Newsline’s Kent Peterson, KC0DGY, talked to the
science teacher who was lucky enough to help her students be chosen to
talk with ISS astronaut William M. “Shep" Shepherd, KD5GSL.

[KENT’s REPORT]:

[Rita] Growing up you live in a certain block and it is like your world
is first is just that block and you go to school and slowly your
horizons they keep expanding as you progress through school. We opened
their eyes to a horizon they didn’t even know about and that was out in
space.

[Kent] In 1996 a junior high school teacher filled in a application for
her school to make a contacts with astronauts.

[Rita] My name is Rita Wright my call sign is KC9CDL I was a science
teacher so I was always looking for something new or different to
implement or put into my lesson plans to make science exiting and more
attractive to to my students.

[Kent] The first full mission in the newly completed International Space
station happened in the fall of 2000. Wright’s school was selected to
make that very first ham radio contact.

[Rita] We became aware of this program and started learning all about it
and participating a bit. These opportunities came up and we just grabbed
them.

[Kent] Finally in December the students all gathered in the school
auditorium for the first school contact with the brand new Space Station.

[Rita] The whole school was involved with the process they all knew
about it . The actual contact was in our auditorium. All the students
were there and we had set up on stage the radios. It was very very
exciting the actual contact, the students were well behaved and anxious
and extremely interested.

[Kent] Wright says a ham radio school contact wasn’t quite in the
regular curriculum.

[Rita] It was not something that was ordinarily done a in a class room
situation. You go in you’re give a text book and you each page one page
two page three etc. What I tried to do was do that plus bring into the
classroom the excitement of what is out there today and what could be
tomorrow for them/ Of course they had to learn the basic lessons in
science, that’s what I taught them. But I also tried to bring to them
what else is out there and what opportunities they could follow I always
tried to open up the world as much as i could to the kids as much as I
could.

[Kent] Retired school teacher Rita Wright recalling the very first
international space station to school ham radio contact fifteen years ago.

For the amateur radio newsline, I’m Kent Peterson KC0DGY

[DON:/ANCHOR]: We should note too that this historic moment wasn’t the
last the kids got to talk with Shepherd. The next friendly exchange
between him and the students came in person – during his visit to the
school in May of the following year. Needless to say, the reception was
perfect.

**

LICENSE CHANGE FOR SOUTH AFRICA’S YOUNGEST HAMS

New regulations from the Independent Communications Authority of South
Africa now allow amateur radio applicants who are younger than 20 and
who pass the Class B exam to hold a ZU or Class B license until age 25.
After that, they must upgrade by taking the Class A exam in order to
receive a Class A license, designated by a ZS or ZR call sign.

The authority’s decision had been based on its belief that the Class B
license’s primary role is to serve as an introduction to amateur radio
and serve as youngsters’ entry point into the hobby. The regulations
were implemented after much input from the South African Radio League,
which had pressed for a reasonable interval of time for the upgrade to
Class A. As a result, the authority has declared that, effective April
1, 2017, all amateurs older than 25 will become ineligible for ZU
license renewals.

(SARL)

**

USING MICROWAVES AS A MAGNET

Speaking of young hams, the Microwave Theory and Techniques Society of
the IEEE is seizing the opportunity to attract students to amateur radio
during its flagship conference in India in early December.

The International Microwave and RF Conference in Hyderabad will be
hosting a special event station, AU2MTT, that will be operating for two
weeks in conjunction with the gathering.

One society member, Jim Rautio, AJ3K, told the ARRL: QUOTE"The special
event is intended to draw attention to ham radio, STEM, and MTT, both
from conference participants and any and all active hams in India." In
addition to encouraging them to pursue their licenses, organizers want
to see more youngsters consider careers in engineering, science,
technology or mathematics.

Rautio said the effort’s emphasis will be on amateur radio’s role in
disaster communications and addressing humanitarian needs. This is being
done through a program known by the acronym, SIGHT, for Special Interest
Group on Humanitarian Technology.

(IEEE, ARRL)

**

BREAK HERE:
Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including the
Stephens County Amateur Radio Society, N4DME repeater, in Toccoa,
Georgia Tuesday nights at 8PM.

**

NOW ON 60 METERS

Christmas is going to come a little early for amateurs in The
Netherlands, who got the gift of a new band for operating. The 60 meter
band, from 5350 kHz to 5450 kHz, was incorporated into the Netherlands
National Frequency Plan, allowing Dutch amateurs with an F-registration
to use the new band on a secondary basis, beginning the middle of this
month. Other nations granting similar privileges recently include
Hungary, Oman and Honduras. Hams in the U.S. have had secondary access
to channelized operation on the band since May 2003, when the FCC gave
its approval.

Sixty meters has also been in the news at the World Radiocommunication
Conference in Geneva, where attendees are considering a new, 15-kHz-wide
secondary allocation on the band, with operators limited to 15 watts of
EIRP. At press time on Nov. 11, the latest report was that consensus on
the matter was looking optimistic.

ARRL, SOUTHGATE AMATEUR RADIO NEWS, VERON, The 5 MHz newsletter)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS

[ANCHOR/DON}: Several distinguished radio amateurs are being honored by
the Radio Club of America at its Awards Banquet and Technical Symposium
Nov. 21 in Cupertino, California. Amateur Radio Newslines Heather Embee,
KB3TZD, has the details:

[HEATHER]: The annual gathering of the Radio Club of America is one of
the top events in wireless communications – and the group uses the
opportunity to tap radio standouts and acknowledge them for their hard
work. The extensive list of honorees this year includes a number of
hard-working hams. Dr. Nathan Cohen, W1YW, has been chosen to receive
the Alfred H. Grebe Award, honoring his work in engineering and
manufacturing of radio equipment. The Ralph Batcher Memorial Award
winner is David Bart, KB9YPD, for helping preserve the history of radio
and electronic communications, including the Radio Club of America’s own
history.

Timothy J. Duffy, K3LR, has been chosen to receive the 2015 President’s
Award for his support to the club. And the Edgar F. Johnson Pioneer
Citation is being given to Gerald L. Agliata, W2GLA, work his work, as
well, with the radio club.

Carole Perry, WB2MGP, a well-known ham radio education advocate, is
being presented with the Vivian A. Carr Award, recognizing her
contributions as a woman in wireless communications.

The keynote speech at the banquet presentation will be delivered by
David Leeson, W6NL. He will discuss Silicon Valley’s bountiful community
of entrepreneurs in the communications field.

But as the list of awardees shows, opportunity and creativity is
everywhere. For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Heather Embee, KB3TZD, in
Berwick, Pennsylvania.

HAMS IN THE HALL OF FAME

Radio Amateurs of Canada is also paying tribute to two notable amateurs
by appointing them to the Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. The
recent appointees are Jim Dean, VE3IQ, of Ottawa, Ontario, and Farrell
(Hoppy) Hopwood, VE7RD, of North Vancouver, British Columbia. Inclusion
in the Hall of Fame means the amateurs have achieved outstanding efforts
in their service to amateur radio in Canada or amateur radio in general.

More details about the awards and the honorees’ contributions will
appear in a forthcoming edition of Canadian Amateur magazine.

(RADIO AMATEURS OF CANADA)

**

THE WORLD OF DX

Harald, DF2WO, is operating as XT2AW from Burkina Faso until November
27. Harald will likely be operating on slow CW. QSLs go to his manager,
M0OXO.

Andi DL9USA and Jan DJ8NK will be active as VP2ECC and VP2ENK
respectively from the Caribbean island of Anguilla until November 18.
They are using CW, SSB and digital and QSLs go via the home call signs.

Martin, LU9EFO, and Faber, HK6F, are operating until November 17 from
San Andres. Call signs will be HK0-slash-followed by their home call
signs. QSL manager is SP5QAZ.

Dave, EI9FBB, is activating Coetivy Island in the Seychelles for the
IOTA program and will operate as S79C. He will be there Nov. 16 through
Nov. 22.

Steve, G0KIK, will is operating holiday style as E51KIK from the South
Cook Islands through Nov. 15. QSLs go to his home call.

(IRISH RADIO TRANSMITTER SOCIETY)

KICKER: RERUNS IN SPACE OR…..RADIO REDUX?

It seems that old jokes, unlike radio waves, have an uncanny ability to
bounce back and return to earth. Take the case of a news prank the BBC
staged a few years ago. A fictonal radio astronomer at an observatory in
Puerto Rico happened upon some old broadcast signals floating out in
space, while attempting to track extra-terrestrial signals from his lab.
Or so the story goes.

He then identified those surprise signals as the transmissions from old
TV broadcasts – identifying them even to the point that he could name
the very TV shows the signals were carrying. Well, the story, like the
signals, got very decent air play for the April Fool’s Day prank the
British broadcasters pulled a couple of years ago. The fictional
astronomer, a Dr. Venn who was not even given a first name by the
creator of this story, had theorized at the time that the signals likely
bounced off some far-away asteroid cloud and thus returned to earth.
Some of the TV shows he identified were said to be 50 years old – or more.

Well, it didn’t take 50 years but something has apparently bounced back
to earth for real – and it’s the old story about these ancient reruns.
Twitter feeds, and other forms of social media, have come alive with
this bizarre tale that old radio waves don’t die, and don’t even fade
away. All of which makes for very poor science – but a very good joke –
even if it’s not April Fool’s.

Perhaps, as we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, we might just consider
it someone else’s old turkey.

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE
With thanks to Alan Labs; AMSAT; the ARRL; the BBC; CQ Magazine; The
5MHz Newsletter; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; IEEE, The Irish Radio
Transmitter Society; the Ohio-Penn DX Newsletter; Radio Amateurs of
Canada; The South African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio News;
TWiT TV; VERON, and you our listeners, that’s all from the Amateur Radio
Newsline. Our email address is newsline@arnewsline.org. More information
is available at Amateur Radio Newsline’s only official website located
at www.arnewsline.org. You can also write to us or support us at Amateur
Radio Newsline, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa Clarita, CA 91350.

For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
and our news team worldwide, I’m Don Wilbanks, AE5DW in Picayune,
Mississippi, saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2015. All rights reserved.


James
KB7TBT
www.arnewsline.org

__._,_.___

Posted by: James – KB7TBT <kb7tbt@gmail.com>

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[ARNEWSLINE] Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1984 November 6 2015

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1984 November 6 2015

Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1984 with a release date of Friday,
November 6, 2015 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST. A new White House report urges better
preparedness for geomagnetic storms. A radio amateur in upstate New York
works QRP to activate a marshland. The Philippine Amateur Radio
Association marks its 83rd year. And in separate preparedness exercises,
hams in Arizona, as well as South Africa, prove they can step in when
disaster strikes. All this and more in Amateur Radio Newsline report
1984 coming your way right now.
(Billboard Cart Here and Intro)

**

CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS? SUPERSIZE ME!

[STEPHEN/ANCHOR]: We begin this week’s newcast with a far-reaching White
House report on geomagnetic storms. It seems that hams aren’t the only
ones concerned with damaging effects of coronal mass ejections. Now the
Obama Administration is formally saying: Be prepared. Amateur Radio
Newsline’s Bobby Best, WX4ALA, tells us more:

[BOBBY:] When massive solar flares — known as coronal mass ejections —
disrupt the ionosphere, it spells loss of the bands for amateur
operators, who can be certain of disastrous QSOs or, more likely, no
QSOs at all. But those three letters – C-M-E – actually spell out a more
wide-ranging loss – a worldwide immobilization that the White House
recently deemed worth bracing for.

Late last month, the Obama Administration released contingency plans
that define roles everyone would play – from the largest federal agency
to the smallest local business – in the event a geomagnetic storm
strikes with epic magnitude.

The official gameplan was drawn up following officials’ extensive study
of the so-called Carrington Event, a CME that ruptured global
communications in 1859 by exploding telegraph lines around the world.
Now, with so many nations electrified and connected by technology and
various intricate power grids, the impact of a similarly supersized CME
could have even more impact, knocking out satellites, GPS measurements
and stranding civilization in a world without an operating infrastructure.

Clearly, this is not solely the stuff of science fiction: The most
recent instance, on a small scale, occurred Sept. 28. An intense solar
flare erupted over South America, with the resulting UV radiation
creating a temporary blackout in low-frequency radio communications.

Exactly one month later — on Oct. 28 — the Obama administration
released its completed plans – the National Space Weather Strategy and
the National Space Weather Action Plan. And with that release came the
announcement of a global strategy for agencies, nonprofits and
individuals everywhere to cooperate and communicate. The release of the
plans comes a week or so before the Military Auxiliary Radio System’s
simulated blackout exercise with the Amateur Radio Emergency Service and
Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service between Saturday, Nov. 7 and
Tuesday, Nov. 10. Timing, it seems, is everything.

For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Bobby Best, WX4ALA, in Jasper, Alabama.

(DIGITALJOURNAL.COM, WHITEHOUSE.GOV BLOG, SPACE.COM)

**

ARTS, CRAFTS & QSOS IN ARIZONA

The Hassayampa Amateur Radio Klub – and yes, they spell “club" with a
“K" – is busy preparing for its HARKFEST, a tailgate hamfest in the
North Ranch Escapees RV Park in Congress, Arizona, on Nov. 14. For those
who can’t wait for the fun to start at 8 a.m., when the four-hour
hamfest opens, organizers note that there is camping available with full
hookup, provided you pre-register. The hamfest will have an arts and
crafts show and lunch will also be available. And oh yes, there’ll be
plenty of amateur radio gear and banter. Talk in on the club’s 2-meter
repeater or on simplex at 146.580 MHz. For more details, visit the
club’s website at http://harkaz.org

**

IN ARIZONA, QUESTIONS ABOUT QUAKES

A more serious effort got underway throughout Arizona on Wednesday, Nov.
4, with a statewide Arizona Ham Radio Exercise known as HAMEX. The
first-ever drill was designed to help radio amateurs understand their
communication roles when disaster strikes their various communities. But
the forces of nature may have conspired to drive that point home with an
even stronger hand, however, after a series of minor earthquakes rumbled
through the region just north of Phoenix, Arizona on Sunday, Nov. 1 – a
few days before HAMEX was schedule. The trio of quakes was considered
rare, of course, but radio amateurs were taking no chances.

Morgan Hoaglin, WW7B, communications coordinator with the Arizona
Department of Emergency and Military Affairs, and the Division of
Emergency Management, said the three real earthquakes, however small,
were certainly a surprise, considering the HAMEX mock disaster being
staged was also centered around an earthquake. He told Amateur Radio
Newsline QUOTE"This exercise caused us to make ready many many amateur
radio modes such as HF, VHF, UHF, WinLink, FLMSG, FNARS and VHF Packet.
We plan to make sure we keep all of the flexibility we display here for
the future."ENDQUOTE

He said 65 hams in Arizona and another 10 working HF out of state were
involved in the exercise and that the diversity of modes, both voice and
data, proved to be the greatest strength of the exercise.

And yes, more such drills are planned for the year ahead. As for its
importance of the Nov. 4 HAMEX, Hoaglin expected no one would question
its value or success: QUOTE:"With the actual Arizona earthquake taking
place a few days prior, we certainly did not have to justify the
realities or feasibility of the exercise."ENDQUOTE

**
CAREERS IN HAM RADIO

Sometimes, ham radio is more than just a hobby – in fact, it can be a
career. Consider these openings now available for qualified radio
amateurs looking to make the most of their talents, skills, interests
and professional development.

In Australia, the Wireless Institute of Australia is looking for an
executive administrator in its Bayswater, Melbourne location. Applicants
should be experienced in working for a nonprofit, community-service
membership organization and should have a good understanding of the WIA
and amateur radio. The deadline to apply for the job is Nov. 30. For
more details on specific job requirements, visit seek.com or the WIA
website, http://www.wia.org.au

In the United States, the ARRL is looking for a contest branch manager
to work out of league headquarters in Newington, Connecticut. The ideal
candidate should have a minimum of five years experience in ham radio
contesting, and will be responsible for a team of about 20 log
adjudicators, results authors and data entry assistants, in and out of
the headquarters building. For more details about the job and
qualifications, visit the ARRL website and navigate to the Employment
Opportunities page.

And finally, if you’re aiming high, really high, the ARRL is looking for
a new Chief Executive Officer to succeed David Sumner, K1ZZ. Sumner is
stepping down as CEO next May, and applications for his successor are
due no later than Nov. 16. The active radio amateur who is chosen for
this position will, among other things, oversee the day-to-day
management of the league and its fiscal operation. Applications, cover
letters and resumes should be sent to Monique Levesque at ARRL
headquarters. She can be emailed at mlevesque@arrl.org

(ARRL, WIRELESS INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA)

**

MY FAVORITE MARSH-MAN

[STEPHEN KINFORD/ANCHOR]: The Hamlin Marsh Wildlife Management Area in
New York’s Adirondack region holds many things in its vast acreage of
wetland: aquatic birds, frogs, deer and various grasses. But it holds
something even more for one Syracuse area ham: endless radio
possibilities. Amateur Radio Newsline’s Don Wilbanks, AE5DW, has the
details:

[DON]: Since earlier this year, Steven Mussi, KD2ETP, has believed he
could enter the upstate New York wetland known as Clay Marsh and find
solid footing for a QRP adventure. So Sunday, Nov. 8, will find Mussi
canoeing out across the swampy landscape, climbing ashore on some
hospitable patch of land, and setting up his Elekraft KX3 and his two
antennas. His one-man special event is called Marshes On The Air. And
his goal is to work the bands, starting on 40 meters, logging as many
contacts QRP as possible until sundown. He told Amateur Radio Newsline,
in a recent phone call, that he has another goal too, one he’s had since
getting his license three years ago: He said QUOTE"I want to do some
things that haven’t been done, to go to places that are kind of
inhospitable."ENDQUOTE

Mussi is no stranger to the wildlife management area near his New York
home. He grew up near Onandaga Lake and has been part of an effort to
restore its cleanliness. He’s also no stranger to off-the-beaten-paths
of radio transmitting: Last February, when it was 15 degrees below with
wind chill, he was heating up the airwaves from an ice shanty on that
very same lake, transmitting in an expedition he called FLOTA, for
Frozen Lakes On The Air.

For Mussi, these outings – like ham radio itself – are about opening up
the fun and the possibilities — options as vast and promising as the
airwaves themselves. He says: QUOTE “Everyone climbs a mountain in some
park and that’s great, I have done some SOTA work, but I think there are
other areas that might be interesting. Going off the beaten path just
requires a little more effort."CLOSE QUOTE Effort, yes, and a lot more
imagination. For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Don Wilbanks, AE5DW, in
Picayune, Mississippi.

BREAK HERE:
Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
KD2SL repeaters and KC2VER 145.31 Fusion Digital Repeater in Syracuse,
New York, on Monday Nights at 8.

(5 second pause)

**

SOUTH AFRICA DRILLS FOR DISASTER

[STEPHEN/ANCHOR]: When a few dozen hams in South Africa were cut off
from civilization late last month, they had a few things going for them:
they had their radios and their antennas, propagation was terrific and,
it was, after all, an exercise to prepare for the real thing. Jeremy
Boot, G4NJH, has the details:

[JEREMY]: The Hamnet Summer Communications Exercise held in late October
in South Africa was such a total disaster – just as everyone had hoped –
that it proved to be a total success. Disaster was the whole idea, in
fact, since the 60 or so participating hams, working in teams, had
committed to operating their field stations in remote locations while
living off the grid, as if some cataclysm had struck. All activities,
including cooking, lighting and of course, radio communications were
done under simulated emergency conditions. But the 16 stations across
South Africa, and in Namibia, benefitted from fortunate propagation
conditions and the experiment went forward on Oct. 24 and 25 as planned.
To communicate, stations contacted one another via random two-word
messages transmitted over channels instead of specified frequencies,
comparing the results later.
Grant Southey, Z-S-ONE-G-S (ZS1GS), the exercise’s principal organizer,
said the teams would be submitting reports about their experiences –
what worked for them and what didn’t – and all participants can expect
to receive a questionnaire to help fine-tune procedures in time for the
next event. After all, next summer is only a year away. For Amateur
Radio Newsline, I’m Jeremy Boot, G4NJH, in Nottingham, in the UK.

(SOUTH AFRICAN RADIO LEAGUE, SOUTHGATE)

**

83 YEARS OF HAM RADIO
The Philippine Amateur Radio Association is marking its 83rd anniversary
with a celebration on Nov. 29 at the Marikina Polytechnic College.
Fox-hunting, license exams, lectures, demonstrations and even the
group’s first-ever Ham Radio Go-Kit contest will round out the all-day
celebration for the national nonprofit group. The keynote speaker will
be JoJo Vicencio, DU1VHY, National Traffic System Chairman and PARA’s
Secretary General.
One of the day’s highlights will be the introduction of the Go-Kit
Contest, highlighting the need for emergency preparedness in the
Philippines, for typhoons and other disasters. Pre-registration for this
contest is required and forms can be downloaded from the website,
www.para.org.ph

**

NATIONAL PARKS COME ALIVE

The ARRL National Parks On The Air event is less than two months away,
marking the park service’s centennial. But in the Australian state of
Victoria, national parks are getting ready to be activated Friday, Nov.
13 through Monday, Nov. 16 by hams pursuing the Keith Roget Memorial
National Parks Award.

The Roget Award, created in 1970, was created to spur amateurs to engage
in portable operations throughout Victoria’s 45 national parks – from
French Island National Park to Wyperfeld National Park. It is made
available through Amateur Radio Victoria and is named for the late Keith
Roget, VK3YQ, a noted portable operator.

(www.amateurradio.com.au)

**

AUSTRALIAN HAMS ARE PUT ON NOTICE

Meanwhile, also in Australia, there’s also a bit of license bookkeeping
to be done. The Australian Communications and Media Authority has been
sending revalidation letters to that country’s amateurs 90 days before
their licenses are due to expire. The process allows licensees to check
their details, or modify them, or even surrender the license, if they
wish. The letters or emails to the hams will include the ACMA license
number but will not contain any individual callsigns.

Hams are advised that, if all the information in the mailing is correct,
and the license is not being surrendered, there is no need to take
action except to pay for renewals of any licenses, where appropriate.

Hams are advised to check with the ACMA to ensure their postal address
or email address is current. Otherwise, the ACMA warns, a license could
be cancelled and an amateur’s callsign could be re-assigned to another ham.

The ACMA can be emailed at info@acma.gov.au

**

FROM POLAND TO NORTH KOREA

Polish radio amateur Dom Grzyb, 3Z9DX, who received permission to
operate in early 2016 from the Democratic People’s Republic of North
Korea is busy preparing for his trip to what is the most elusive and
most wanted DXCC entity. His plans are to travel to the capital,
Pyongyang, in December and firm up his operation’s guidelines with
officials there. He will be bringing his rig and a vertical antenna to
show them. He has been approved to operate with the callsign P5/3Z9DX on
three bands, using 100 watts. His goal is to concentrate on 20 meter
operation, working SSB, over the course of five days, but he may also
work 15 and 10 meters. Such an operation would be a major achievement
for any ham. The last DXCC-approved operation from North Korea was in
2001 and 2002. Ed Giorgadze, 4L4FN, of the Republic of Georgia worked
SSB and RTTY as P5/4L4FN. Giorgadze had been in the country at the time,
working for the UN’s World Food Program in Pyongyang.

(ARRL, DXNEWS)

**

THE WORLD OF DX
Henning, O-Z-ONE-B-I-I (OZ1BII), will be active as 9H3EE from Malta
between Nov. 24 and 30th. He will work 160 through 10 meters with an
emphasis on 30/17/12 meters using CW only. He will also participate in
the CQ WorldWide DX CW Contest on Nov. 28 and 29th, working a
Single-Op/All-Band/Low-Power entry. QSL via OZ1BII or ClubLog.

Toshi, JA8BMK, is active as 4W/JA8BMK from Timor Leste until Nov. 9,
working 80 and 40 meters, using mainly CW. QSL via JA8BMK direct only.

Marking the National Rifle Association’s 144th birthday, members of the
Yavapai Amateur Radio Club of Prescott, Arizona, will operate a special
event station November 17th. The operators will be at Gunsite Academy’s
2,000-acre campus in Paulden, Arizona, using the callsign K7NRA. They
will work several HF frequencies and offer a certificate for successful
contacts. Send a QSL with a 9 x 12 stamped, self-addressed envelope to
YARC, P.O. Box 1199, Prescott, Arizona 86304.

Yuriy, N2TTA, will once again be active as NP2P during the CQWW DX CW
Contest on Nov. 28 and 29th as a Single-Op/All-Band/ Low-Power entry.
QSL via LoTW. During the same contest, Alfredo (Al), WP3C, will be
active as NP4A from Puerto Rico as a Single-Op/Single-Band (40m)/
High-Power entry. QSL via W3HNK.

(OHIO PENN DX NEWSLETTER)

**

KICKER: THE ULTIMATE CHAT
Since late October, students in the ham radio club at Bloomington High
School South in Bloomington, Indiana have been able to do a bit of DXing
a little differently. There’s no QRN — and there are QSL cards either.
The youngsters and their club have been starring in a 7-minute video
about their ham radio club, K9SOU. The video is a segment of a program
produced each week by the school’s Mass Media Class and even though
Indiana is not on the DXCC list, anyone, near or far, can see the club
in action on YouTube.

In the video, the teens, including club president Ryan Cutshall, KD9DAB,
talk about their involvement in the hobby. And the video shows the young
hams working October’s ARRL School Club Roundup. It was during that same
busy month that the students also participated in the CQ WorldWide SSB
DX contest.

The club’s sponsor, Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, told Amateur Radio Newsline that
the DX contest was a first for the club, which Rapp reawakened from its
dormancy in 2002 when he moved to Bloomington to teach AP Chemistry at
the school. He said the school is an ARRL Education & Technology Program
school, and that’s how the club got its first station. Rapp adds:
QUOTE"The kids fundraised a 2 element SteppIR antenna a couple of years
ago, and our contesting efforts really blossomed."ENDQUOTE

The students have blossomed too. Last year’s winner of the Young Ham of
the Year Award was Padraig Lysandrou, KC9UUS, who also received the ARRL
Goldfarb Scholarship, the Hiram Percy Maxim award, and spoke at the
Dayton Hamvention Youth Forum. And that’s just for starters. Being a ham
runs in the family too. For the past two years, his younger sister,
Maria, KD9BUS, has been vice president of the Bloomington South club.

There are not quite 30 members in the club, Rapp says. But interest
continues to grow.

As does listenership and now, viewership. It seems that since the video
posted online, the club can do a bit of DXing on its own anytime it
wants, via YouTube. To see the video, visit our Amateur Radio Newsline
website and look for the link below this story. Best of all, you won’t
have to worry about any pileups.

NEWSCAST CLOSE
With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT; Amateurradio.com Australia; the ARRL,
CQ Magazine, DXWorld, Hap Holly and the Rain Report; NASA, the Ohio-Penn
DX Newsletter; Ron Panetta, WB2WGH; Philippine Amateur Radio
Association; South African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio News,
Tony Hart, KC2VER; TWiT TV, QRZNOW, UPSTATEHAM.COM, and you our
listeners. Our email address for news tips and comments is
arnewslinetips@gmail.com. More information is available at Amateur Radio
Newsline’s only official website located at www.arnewsline.org. You can
also write to us or support us at Amateur Radio Newsline, 28197 Robin
Avenue, Santa Clarita, CA 91350.
For now, I’m Stephen Kinford, N8WBX, in Wadsworth, Ohio, with Caryn Eve
Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York, and our
news team worldwide saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.
Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2015. All rights reserved.


James
KB7TBT
www.arnewsline.org

__._,_.___

Posted by: James – KB7TBT <kb7tbt@gmail.com>

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CTARL訊息-1105

各位OM大家好!
有一批QSL卡等待領取,招領清單請上網站http://www.ctarl.org.tw/bv5ya/2009-10/QSL-card-list-1041020.xls
全台中繼實驗點測試中,有需要參與測試實驗的同好請與各區幹部聯繫!
相關訊息亦可上網參閱
本週活動訊息:
104年度中部分會會員大會
活動日期:2015年11月8日 星期日 早上07:30至中午15:00
主辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會中部分會。
協辦單位:中部業餘無線電愛好者聯誼會 (578俱樂部),大台灣經穴按摩中心
活動地點:台中市太平區聖和里長龍路一段73之一號
活動內容:採二階段式進行
第一階段:有要健行(登山)的同好
請於當日早上07:20至BM4JPO大台灣經穴按摩中心集合 (411台中市太平區永平里東平路489號)
預計中午11:00下山 11:30在411台中市太平區(一江橋)長龍路與光興路 便利商店集合
第二階段:不參加登山健行的同好
請於當日中午11:30在411台中市太平區(一江橋)長龍路與光興路口 萊爾富便利商店集合
午餐:台雞店餐廳 (411台中市太平區聖和里長龍路一段73之一號)
費用:使用者付費為原則,大約平均每人約250元至300元(會員,非會員,眷屬)採合菜 10人一桌 現場收費
另非會員如要參加 本會歡迎 請於104.10.31日前完成報名手續 逾期不接受報名
報名請洽:分會長 BV4PB黃正宏0932-520653
近期活動訊息:
IARU 成立 90 周年通訊活動(BV90IARU)
活動日期:2015年10月17日~12月31日
主辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會 .
欲參與操作之同好請與BV2FP聯繫!
———————————————————————————————————-
通信紀錄軟體Logger32研討會
活動日期:2015年12月6日(星期日) 早上09:15 至 16:00
主辦單位:中鋼業餘無線電社
協辦單位:中華民國業餘無線電促進會南部分會,高雄業餘無線電俱樂部。
活動地點:高雄市小港區中鋼路1號 (中鋼會議室)
費    用:免費(含午餐)
活動內容:1. 請攜帶筆記型電腦或個人電腦.
                  2. Logger32 安裝,設定.
                  3. 操作方法說明.
                  4. 增強插件介紹.
注意事項:中鋼大門有管制,請提早10分鐘到達門口集合帶隊入場.
聯絡人   : BV7CW(0937635674), BV7FO(0921236791), BV7RF(0933651780)
———————————————————————————————————-
2015 ARDF 全國無線電電波測向(獵狐)競賽活動
活動日期:104年12月20日 09:30-16:00
活動地點:宜蘭敏通快樂農場(宜蘭縣冬山鄉新寮一路260號)
主辦單位:敏通企業股份有限公司
協辦單位:台北城市科技大學 電通系
                 中華民國業餘無線電促進會
                 中華業餘人造衛星協會
報名截止:104年12月7日止或報名人數額滿80人止
報名聯絡人:李先生 0972808359 cce2611@gmail.com
———————————————————————————————————-
北部分會會員知識分享課程活動
主題: 待定
講師:BV3FG
時間:2015/待定

地點:北市萬華區青山里里民活動中心(台北市萬華區環河南路2段臨5之1號)

73,

BV2FP
David Kao 高大為
中華民國業餘無線電促進會
Chinese Taipei Amateur Radio League
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[ans] ANS-319 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE

ANS-319

 

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor- mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

 

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

 

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:

ans-editor at amsat.org.

 

In this edition:

 

* EO-79 CubeSat Update

* QB50 Frequency Table

* Newsline Interview With ISS First School Contact Teacher

* Signal Reports Requested From IO-86 FM Transponder Test

* ARISS Contact Featured in ARRL Radio Waves Newsletter

* McMurdo completes MEOSAR satellite ground station in New Zealand

 

 

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-319.01

ANS-319 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

 

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 319.01

From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.

November 15, 2015

To All RADIO AMATEURS

BID: $ANS-319.01

 

EO-79 CubeSat Update

 

Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG has provided this update on the status and plans for

QB50p1 – EO-79.

 

Earlier testing campaigns indicate that the AMSAT-UK/AMSAT-NL transponder on board of this spacecraft is in good health. We have activated the transponder on various occasions for testing purposes.

 

At the moment we believe the power system is capable of sustaining transponder operations indefinitely. ISIS (the satellite designer and operator) still needs to write and apply a software patch that would keep the transponder running. The current logic in the satellite will switch off the transponder if a reset occurs of the On Board Computer or power system.

 

Efforts are being made to allow usage of the transponder in the mean time and also allow select command stations to take the satellite out of safe mode if it does reset. ISIS will continue to monitor all telemetry and the satellites health.

 

The precursor satellites have gathered valuable data about the sensor payloads, and the lessons learnt are being implemented in the flight units for the

QB50

main mission.

 

We will still have to wait until procedures are in place and the activation is cleared by the operator and owners of the satellite, but we are nearly ready for the activation of another transponder!

 

Transponder activations will be announced on the AMSAT Bulletin Board.

 

On behalf of AMSAT-NL and the ISIS operations team I would like to thank the community for supporting our mission and thank you for your patience.

 

[ANS thanks Wouter, PA3WEG, for the above information]

 

 

———————————————————————

 

 

QB50 Frequency Table

 

Here is a link worth keeping an eye on as the QB50 launch in 2016 gets closer. JE9PEL has a page documenting the frequencies of the 50 cubesats at:

 

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/qb50sats.htm

 

[ANS thanks Mineo Wakita, JE9PEL, for the above information]

 

 

———————————————————————

 

 

Newsline Interview With ISS First School Contact Teacher

 

This week’s Amateur Radio Newsline Report 1985 November 13, 2015 includes an interview with Rita Wright, KC9CDL, the science teacher who was lucky enough to help her students be chosen to talk with ISS astronaut William M. “Shep”

Shepherd, KD5GSL, for the first school contact with the International Space Station.

 

Amateur Radio Newsline has this week’s bulletins posted at:

 

http://www.arnewsline.org/news/2015/11/13/amateur-radio-newsline-report-1985-

november-13-2015.html

 

Select ‘Script’ or ‘Audio’ to access the newscast as desired.

 

[ANS thanks the Amateur Radio Newsline for the above information]

 

 

———————————————————————

 

 

Signal Reports Requested From IO-86 FM Transponder Test

 

The FM transponder aboard IO-86/LAPAN-ORARI was activated for testing, and was available for amateur radio use on 14 November 2015 between 01:35 UTC –

03:40

UTC. This satellite is in a 6° inclination orbit so only stations in equatorial regions have access. Station in far southern United States may have access.

 

+ Uplink:   145.880Mhz with 88.5 Hz tone

+ Downlink: 435.880 Mhz

 

If you heard IO-86 or had any contacts please e-mail signal reports to yd1eee@gmail.com

 

The two-line Keplerian elements are:

 

IO-86

1 40931U 15052B   15316.15776324  .00001070  00000-0  60618-4 0 9994

2 40931   6.0030  69.3893 0012877 275.6206  84.2533 14.76374433 6653

 

These are also included in the keps download available from www.amsat.org

 

[ANS thanks Dirgantara Rahadian. YE0EEE for the above information]

 

 

———————————————————————

 

 

ARISS Contact Featured in ARRL Radio Waves Newsletter

 

The American Radio Relay League’s Fall 2015 issue of “Radio Waves", a newsletter for teachers, license instructors, and radio science education features coverage of the ARISS contact with Tulsa Community College. The PDF issue can be accessed

at:

http://www.arrl.org/radio-waves

 

[ANS thanks the ARRL for the above information]

 

 

———————————————————————

 

 

McMurdo completes MEOSAR satellite ground station in New Zealand

 

 

The legacy of AMSAT OSCAR 6 & 7 in demonstrating satellite based Doppler location of ground transmitters for search-and-rescue operations in the 1970s set the stage for the Cospas-Sarsat system which is now entering into the next stage of evolution.

 

McMurdo’s next-generation MEOSAR satellite ground station system installation in New Zealand will reduce rescue times in one of the world’s most active search and rescue regions.

 

McMurdo has announced that it has completed the installation of a six-antenna next-generation Medium-Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) satellite ground station system in New Zealand.

 

The project, which is part of a joint initiative with Maritime New Zealand and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, is expected to significantly boost search and rescue capability in the New Zealand and Australia search regions and marks the first implementation of MEOSAR in Asia Pacific. MEOSAR is the

next-

generation version of Cospas-Sarsat, the international search and rescue satellite system that has helped to save 37,000 lives since 1982.

 

In a typical satellite-based search and rescue scenario, ships, aircraft or individuals transmit distress signals from an emergency location beacon via satellite to a fixed ground receiving station or local user terminal.

The ground

station receives and calculates the location of the distress signal and creates and sends an alert to the appropriate rescue authorities.

 

Today, the beacon-to-alert process depends on a limited number of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites and may take several hours before a position is confirmed. With MEOSAR, beacon signals will be received more quickly and beacon locations identified with greater accuracy thereby reducing this time to minutes.

 

The New Zealand MEOSAR system, and another being installed in Western Australia, will cover one of the largest search and rescue areas in the world – from north of Australia/New Zealand to the Equator and south to the South Pole, east to half way across the Pacific, and west half way across the Indian Ocean. The systems will undergo rigorous testing before being officially brought online in late 2017 by Cospas-Sarsat.

 

[ANS thanks SpaceDaily for the above information]

 

 

/EX

 

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi- tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT Office.

 

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu- dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.

Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership information.

 

73,

This week’s ANS Editor,

Lee McLamb, KU4OS

ku4os at amsat dot org

 

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